kpix-7-2013-masthead kcbs 7-2013-masthead

San Francisco Events

Outside Lands Music Festival - S...

Photo

Aug 12, 2012

All Day

Transverse & Kennedy Drives
San Francisco, CA

Map

Performers:

  • Franz Ferdinand
  • City and Colour
  • 20 More
    • Amadou et Mariam
    • Trampled by Turtles
    • Santigold
    • Electric Guest
    • Regina Spektor
    • Rebelution
    • Tom Morello: The Nightwatchman
    • Allen Stone
    • Bloc Party
    • Wolfgang Gartner
    • Bomba Estereo
    • big gigantic
    • Jack White
    • Dispatch
    • Jovanotti
    • Caveman
    • Skrillex
    • fun.
    • Birdy
    • Stevie Wonder

More Info

Performer Info

Franz Ferdinand: It's music of the night: to fling yourself around your room to as you psyche yourself for an evening of hedonism, for the dance-floor, flirtation, for your desolate heart-stop, for losing it and loving losing it, for the chemical surge in your bloodstream. It's for that lonely hour gently rocking yourself, waiting for dawn and it all to be even again.

By the end of 2006 we were exhausted - physically, emotionally and creatively. We'd been in the studio or on the road for three years without a break and we needed one. Alex went to Vancouver with the Cribs, Paul raised a family, Bob made a film and Nick disappeared in South America. We met up again in Glasgow a few months later, happy to be in each other's company and excited about creating something new.

Nick found a building for our HQ. He has a knack for it. It was a crumbling Victorian town hall, recently vacated by the drug rehabilitation unit that was the last tenant. The flock wallpaper was peeling a little and the psychedelic municipal carpet was browned with fifty years of council nicotine, but the vibe was great and the monthly rent was half the daily rate of a London studio. There was a noise complaint from the nearby home for the deaf after our first session, but after we blocked the windows with fibreglass and rockwall nobody knew we were there. Daylight disappeared and night became permanent. We didn't notice it, but the mood of the record began to form.

We started writing, but there wasn't a plan. There has never been a plan. As we wrote songs, we played them out at gigs - not huge gigs, but sweaty pub basements and social clubs, keeping it word of mouth and chaotic, giving the new music room to live or die. You don't realise what's good about a song until you play it to people. You also don't know if a song's crap until you play it to people. "Anyone In Love" died in the Captain's Rest, but Turn It On turned us on. "English Goodbye" died in the British Aluminium Club, Fort William, but Ulysses became something more than it was when we left Glasgow. We spent a few days with Brian Higgins and his Xenomania team in Kent. We enjoyed the time and it was inspiring, but it became clear to both of us that we shouldn't make a record together. Our worlds are too different.

The HQ evolved into a studio with the help of Paul Savage. Paul was drummer of the Delgadoes and the engineer at Chem 19, the Chemikal Underground studio in Glasgow. We brought over an old Flickinger console that Bill Skibbe found for us in Michigan and Allen Johnston wired the rooms.

Then we met Dan Carey. He was perfect as a producer - a mad mixer, a chaotic experimenter. Recording with him is like breaking into a science lab with a mischievous brainbox who wants to see what we can blow up. We had a laugh.

Nick climbed into the rafters of the hall to hang a mic from a thirty foot cable which Dan swung across an amp kicked over and feeding back from Alex's guitar, so we could warp the sound with the Doppler effect of a passing racing car or a diving spitfire on What She Came For. A gaggle of obscure and long forgotten 70's synths were mobilised for the likes of Can't Stop Feeling & Lucid Dreams. Superslinkies hung from the ceiling as primitive spring reverb. Sometimes, on the likes of Live Alone, we'd go super hi-fi and tight in the dead room, then, on tracks like Send Him Away we'd rock out in the cellar under the stage, playing to one mic, so it sounded like it was just you and the band in the room when you played the tape back. We rattled human bones for percussion on No You Girls and sang into the darkness, nothing for company apart from the tingle on your spine and the ghosts of the Saturday night dancing.

Anyway, here it is. Tonight: Franz Ferdinand. You can listen to it quiet, but it's better loud. You can listen to it during the day, but it's better at night.

City and Colour: "I'm no king, I wear no crown. but desperate times seem over now. yet still i weaken somehow and it tears me apart." my name is dallas. i cant sleep. i play music. finish strong.

Santigold: This is better than good; this is gold— SANTIGOLD!

Santigold is a survivor of a half century worth of living along musical evolution’s most cutting edges. The only live act that can boast of having out-aged Barbara Bush, having outlived Mr. Miyagi and out styled Liberace, Santigold is here with future flavor.

Already receiving weighty club rotation and airplay in urban Afghanistan and downtown Beirut, Santigold is the first act of the century to boast a post-war following on the International Space Station Mir. Following a live performance broadcast from three thousand miles off the Cape of Good Hope last June, inmates at Leavenworth Penitentiary received Santigold with a celebratory confetti parade. Just another first for the modern super group that knows no bound.

Composed of absolutely no members, Santigold is also the first musical outfit capable of claiming the planet’s broiling collective consciousness as their front woman. Longtime collaborator, singer and songwriter Santi White says of her work with Santigold, “We began trying to write pop songs to sell, which made us depressed, so we started writing songs for ourselves instead.” The results of that self centered conceit is the songwriting work heard for the first time on the full length self-titled Santigold album, released in 2008 on Downtown/Lizard King (US) and Atlantic (UK).

As unmastered tracks leaked over the internet this past November, the request lines of radio stations from Miami to Hanoi began freezing with a flood of calls from listeners eager to hear the new Santigold sound over their frequencies. From his radio show in the United Arab Emirates capital city of Abu Dhabi, Michael Jackson (the King of Pop) played what Santigold snippets he had been able to pirate from a bootleg MySpace page dedicated to the group. Days later, BBC Radio One reported that the unreleased Santigold debut was heard blasting from the iPod shuffle of Libyan ruler Moammar Qaddafi as he entered an international summit in the Nigerian capital of Abuja. Recognizing the urgent need to address the uproarious buzz, Santigold released the following statement through their label reps : “The response to our unmastered songs has been both premature and phenomenal! We were happy to hear that the children of Darfur have found hope in our melodic interpretation of life on the battlefield of love! We’re hoping that each and every 20-something from downtown San Francisco to central Mumbai will also learn something from our work! And to the people dropping no-knock fire on old ladies in Atlanta: shame on you! Santigold ain’t with that shit!”

The trajectory of such early successes leading to newfound political clout is nothing new for Santigold, whose debut album, though half a century in the making, is sure to rock glass pipes from the Lincoln Memorial to Buckingham palace. The flavor of the gold is guaranteed: Santigold!

Regina Spektor: Not since Tori Amos has there been such a fiery red-headed piano playing wunderkind. As a progenitor of New York's anti-folk scene, Spektor has led the genre with her piano-pop driven melodies and her hauntingly beautiful upper range vocals. Regina Spektor's concert schedule keeps the busy indie darling on the road throughout the year. Regina Spektor tour dates are currently scheduled throughout 2011.

A native of Moscow, Spektor and her family immigrated to the United States after the fall of the Soviet Union when she was only nine years old. They transplanted themselves into the ever vibrant New York City where Spektor honed her already present classical piano skills. Spektor ditched her cherished piano in Russia for the eclectic punk and hip-hop styles of Brooklyn. Ultimately, she found a way to incorporate all of her musical passions. After graduating from the Conservatory of Music at Purchase College, Spektor returned to New York and performed in East Village venues during the anti-folk movement. Spektor issued her first two discs 11:11 in 2001 and Songs in 2002 before signing a deal with Sire Records in 2003.

She released her major label debut Soviet Kitsch in 2003 which reflected the everlasting influence of her heritage. Regina Spektor tour dates were scheduled alongside The Strokes during their Room on Fire tour in 2004. Additional Regina Spektor concert dates were scheduled on Kings of Leon's European tour as the opening act. The exposure on high-profile tours certainly paid off for Regina who released her fourth album Begin to Hope in 2006. It became her first album to chart on the Billboard 200 where it peaked at #70. The album was eventually certified gold and ranked at #21 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the best albums of the year. The single "Fidelity" was featured in several movies and TV shows such as CSI:NY and Criminal Minds. Regina Spektor tour dates were booked on her first headliner where she played to sold out shows.

Regina Spektor's concert schedule also included appearances at the Bonnaroo Music Festival, Lollapalooza, and Virgin Festival in 2007. Spektor returned in 2009 with her most recent studio album Far. The album is her most critically acclaimed to-date and debuted at #3 on the Billboard 200 to become a commercial success as well. Regina Spektor's piano-driven melodies are heightened by her conscious lyrics which at times are hopeful and melancholy. Regina Spektor tour dates were scheduled nationally to support the album. Additional Regina Spektor concert dates were booked at a series of performances in London's Hyde Park and throughout Europe in 2009. She released a live album Live in London which featured her hair raising show at the Hammersmith Apollo Theatre in 2010.

Regina Spektor's music is pop-folk, unconventional, yet very much aligned with what we want to hear. Her music features the contentious battle between happiness and sorrow and her lyrics get into our core and make us think. Her multifarious sound will visit international venues and festivals this 2011. Regina Spektor tour dates are scheduled periodically throughout the year. Use Eventful as your source for the Regina Spektor concert schedule.

Rebelution: Rebelution is one of the latest reggae bands to emerge from the burgeoning California reggae scene. Rebelution has their reggae roots in the fertile ground of Isla Vista, a Santa Barbara community in California, and initially made a name for themselves playing local shows. These laid-back, relaxed concert dates that shaped not only their future music, but also their hugely successful tour dates. The band's popularity is due in part to the velvet smooth vocal stylings of lead singer Eric Rachmany and simple yet melodic reggae riffs. Recently, Rebelution spread the seeds of their homegrown reggae at tour dates on the 2011 Winter Greens Tour. Now fans can look forward to tour dates on the 2011 Seedless Summer Tour with Slightly Stoopid.

Rebelution began as a college band between friends Eric Rachmany (lead singer/guitar), Matt Valesquez (vocals/guitar), Rory Carey (keyboard), Wesly Finney (drums), and Marley Williams (bass). The band played local concert dates and their slight popularity prompted the group to produce a self-titled EP in 2006. With both their album and shows becoming popular in a town known for its love of music, Rebelution found the perfect company to release its first full-length album: Controlled Substance Sound Labs.

Rebelution's album, Courage to Grow, released in June of 2007 to great success, with the single "Safe and Sound" playing on radio stations from San Francisco to San Diego. Commercial success continued when the album reached #4 on Billboard's Top Reggae Albums, launching Rebelution into the public eye. Unfortunately, guitarist Matt Velasquez left shortly after the album's release, leaving the band short a guitar and a set of pipes. Instead of replacing Velasquez, Rebelution continued to record albums and play tour dates as a four-piece band. However, Velasquez's departure didn't hinder Rebelution, as the reggae group founded their own record label - 87 Music - to release their follow-up album. Bright Side of Life was released in August 2009 and earned even more success than the previous album, this time reaching the #1 spot on Billboard's Top Reggae Albums. The album also took the #1 reggae spot on iTunes, placing #3 in overall top albums in the United States.

The success of the album sent Rebelution on a number of concert dates in 2010, including the Harmony Festival in Santa Rosa, CA with label mates The Expendables and Slightly Stoopid. Even after recently releasing their Remix EP, Rebelution is continuing to perform a number of 2011 tour dates. Rebelution is starting summer off right with a number of scheduled tour dates for 2011 music festivals in the states, including: The Wakarusa Music Festival, CrossroadsKC, the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival, the Dave Matthews Band Caravan Festival, and the High Sierra World Music Festival. After a concert dates at the All Good Music Festival, Rebelution is heading out on 2011 tour dates on the Seedless Summer Tour with Slightly Stoopid and Shwayze & Cisco Adler. The first concert date is on July 21 in Missoula, Montana and end on August 27 in Chicago, which will subsequently end Rebelution's scheduled tour dates in 2011. With such a busy year, fans can't expect Rebelution to schedule many more tour dates in 2011, so they take the opportunity to these darlings of the reggae scene.

Tom Morello: The Nightwatchman: Few rock guitarists in the 1990s were as groundbreaking as Rage Against the Machine's Tom Morello, who incorporated a myriad of different styles into his own playing. Born in New York City on May 30, 1964, Morello was raised by his mother (who, decades later, would help create the anti-censorship organization Parents for Rock & Rap) in Libertyville, IL. As a teenager, Morello became infatuated with both rock music and politics, as he was almost entirely self-taught on guitar (in fact, he learned the most about the instrument while practicing up to eight hours a day during a stint at Harvard University, where Morello majored in political science). Upon graduation, Morello relocated to the Los Angeles area, where he decided to try and make a career out of music (making ends meet by working for a spell as a California senator's secretary). By the late '80s, Morello was a member of L.A. rockers Lock Up, who inked a deal with Geffen and issued a lone album, 1989's Something Bitchin' This Way Comes. When the album sank without a trace upon release, the group broke up.

But Morello already had plans for his next project, which would be more thought-provoking and politically minded (taking a cue from such respected artists as the Clash and Public Enemy) and harder-edged musically. Joined by vocalist/rapper Zack de la Rocha, bassist Tim Commerford, and drummer Brad Wilk, Rage Against the Machine was born in 1991. Over the course of a four-album career -- 1992's self-titled release (an album which many point to as the trailblazer for the heavy metal/rap style, inspiring countless other bands in its wake), 1996's Evil Empire, 1999's The Battle of Los Angeles, and 2000's all-covers Renegades -- Rage Against the Machine became one of rock's leading (and most confrontational) bands. But rumors of friction between de la Rocha and the rest of the members continued to persist (stemming from the fact that the frontman wanted to issue a solo album), and shortly before the release of the fourth album, de la Rocha left the band. Undeterred, Morello and the rest of the Rage members enlisted the services of former Soundgarden frontman Chris Cornell, forming the group Civilian, which would later be redubbed Audioslave.

In addition to his work with Rage and Audioslave, Morello has lent his playing (and in some cases, production) talents to recordings by a variety of other artists, including Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, the Crystal Method, Perry Farrell, Primus, Puff Daddy/Jimmy Page, and Run-D.M.C., as well as collaborating with enigmatic Alice in Chains singer Layne Staley on a cover version of Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall, Pt. 2" for the soundtrack of the 1998 film The Faculty. Morello also performs solo material sporadically under his political folk alter ego, the Nightwatchman.

Bloc Party: Friday, October 24th, 2003 was a big night. In a freezing, graffiti-scarred old factory called Electrowerkz in Islington, north London, Bloc Party showed what disco-punk sounds like if you take away the cowbells and irony, and replace them with ferocity and tension. In doing so, they proved they belong on a larger stage.

Kele Okereke and guitarist Russell Lissack knew each other through mutual friends in Essex where Kele went to school and Russell lived. They met again at the Reading Festival in 1999 and resolved to start a band together. They wrote together in bedrooms. For months. And months. Slowly, methodically, they got better. In early 2000 they posted an ad for a bass player in the NME, and through that they met Gordon Moakes. Three years and eight drummers later, the band finally came together when they met Matt Tong.

The rest of 2003 was spent building up their gigging muscles. By the time of the Elektrowerkz and Metro shows, Bloc Party were an intense live act.

Into 2004 and Bloc Party were on the march. Shes Hearing Voices, a rumbling, vaguely sinister song, was recorded in their cheap, moldy but special rehearsal space in Acton, west London. Paul Epworth produced their second single, the amphetamined ska-pop of Banquet (released in the UK on Moshi Moshi, and in the US on Dim Mak).

Bloc Party soon signed with Wichita UK, the little East London label with big ideas. They had a dark, brooding, often ferocious sound to scare the parents and remind older siblings of the artier end of New Wave. Melody and energy to inspire the moshpit.

Meanwhile, in July, as the headlines raged, the reviews raved and their third single Little Thoughts dived into the UKs Top 40, Bloc Party nipped off to Copenhagen with Paul Epworth. Destination: Deltalab Studios, home of Junior Senior (oh yes), retro Sixties/Seventies décor, and racks of malfunctioning vintage equipment. Purpose: 22 days to record 15 tracks. Problems: bare mains cables and a kit that wouldnt play ball.

The result of those 22 days in a raw, dangerous setting was Silent Alarm. The album title is taken from a New Scientist article about earthquake morning systems. The band liked the resonance, felt it fitted with the music. A warning, but an ambiguous one. Unrest. Tension. Energy.

Positive Tension is a case in point, a throbbing, techno-flavored epic with huge, Nirvana-style riffing. So Here We Are, a shimmering hit-in-waiting. Opening things, Like Eating Glass, a shouty, wire-y clarion call. Rounding things off, album finale Compliments, a more atmospheric, downbeat, intense track from this upbeat, agit-funk four-piece.

Lets go back a bit, to the ideas and manifestos. Sitting at the heart of Silent Alarm is Pioneers. So says the band, its a warning to those who think they can change the world. Not everyone can, hardly anyone does. Its about talking up your own limitations. Trying to break down the ridiculousness attached to rock bands. If were about anything were about that avoiding cliché, letting ideas stand for themselves.

Wolfgang Gartner: The name Wolfgang is synonymous with greatness. Name your baby Wolfgang, and he may grow up to be one of the world’s leading chefs, or a member of a seminal band like Kraftwerk or Van Halen. In keeping with that tradition, in less than three years the producer and DJ known as Wolfgang Gartner has gone from strength to strength, with eight 1 tracks on Beatport (including the site’s best-selling track of 2009) and remixes for A-list artists (Black Eyed Peas, Timbaland, Britney Spears), all lauded by peers such as David Guetta, Tïesto, and Pete Tong. No, with the forename Wolfgang, Gartner’s success shouldn’t surprise anyone. And yet it does. Because that is his stock in trade: surprising listeners. “Right now, I feel like I have a responsibility to advance the genre,” he says. “I have to come up with something completely new, that’s never been done before.” Just study a couple of Gartner’s smashes to understand how rapidly his game keeps changing. The melody of “Undertaker” is composed from an encyclopedia array of electronic timbres, chopped into succinct, rapid-fire bits, yet solid hooks anchor the whole track; while the record is instantly recognizable, it packs so much information into its grooves it’s impossible for the brain to become overly-familiar with it. “Firepower” opens with a neo-classical melody, gives way to a brief passage of glistening arpeggios reminiscent of Vangelis or Tangerine Dream, then throws down an array of beats that explode in patterned bursts like Chinese New Year. Yet Gartner isn’t simply an underground sensation. He has played before thousands at events like Coachella and Ultra Music Festival. Black Eyed Peas main man will.i.am has already tapped him for collaborations, and legendary record executive Jimmy Iovine—who has nurtured the careers of icons ranging from Eminem to Stevie Nicks—has displayed a strong interest in Gartner. The number of requests he gets to remix other artists’ tracks has reached a point where he elects to decline ninety-nine percent of them (“I generally only work with artists for whom I have great respect and admiration”). Like another famous Wolfgang, Gartner started his artistic experiments at a very young age. As a little boy growing up in California he studied piano, playing both classical and jazz. But it was during a family trip to Tanzania when he was 11 years old that Gartner was turned on to dance music, in the form of a mix tape that featured Kevin Saunderson’s 1988 crossover techno hit “Good Life.” “I heard that track and it completely changed the chemical structure of my brain.” Back home in America, he began making his own forays into the field, producing original tracks on drum machines and keyboards while other kids were off at soccer practice or watching cartoons. Unlike Mozart, Gartner’s genius didn’t translate into the misadventures of an enfant terrible. Quite the opposite: “I spent all my time with music… alone.” With the onset of adolescence, he began sharing his handiwork with the world. At 13, he procured a set of tape decks with pitch controls and a four track mixer, and started playing basement parties. A year later, he graduated to turntables, and by 16 he’d begun spinning in nightclubs. As a consequence of his well-trained ear, he was particularly attuned to harmony, eschewing the classic rookie mistake of mixing tracks in incompatible keys. “I never wanted to compromise the integrity of the music,” he recalls. That commitment to the integrity of the music continues to this day. Gartner is meticulous in his approach to crafting new tracks in the studio, contemplating how they’ll sound in different venues and new ways to pitch curveballs at the dance music cognoscenti—without using gratuitous gimmicks. Whereas many producers start with a rhythm track, Gartner is more likely to begin with a melody and a concept, and experiment… and experiment and experiment… until the pieces begin to click. “Music doesn’t just come out of thin air,” he admits. “Inspiration is a natural process.” And it can’t be forced. As he moves forward, Gartner doesn’t want to just advance his art form—he also wants to put a fresh twist on Top 40 fare. “I definitely want to work with pop and rap artists as a producer.” So long as his identity and integrity remain intact: “I want to make what I like making, and if a rapper can rap on it, then great.” With numerous new projects in the pipeline, he still appreciates the distinction between world domination and overexposure. “I’m definitely about quality over quantity,” he concludes. With Wolfgang Gartner, only one thing is certain: his next move is always a surprise.

Bomba Estereo: Bomba Estéreo, the new psychedelic cumbia from Bogotá, Colombia. The group, a musical project formed by Simón Mejía [w/ singer Liliana Saumet] in 2005, represents a new sound coming from Colombia. Their music merges folk sounds from the Colombian caribbean coast like cumbia, bullerengue and champeta mixed with electronica, reggae and hip-hop producing an explosive dance sound.

Jack White: An American musician, singer, songwriter, record producer, multi-instrumentalist and occasional actor. He was best known as the guitarist, pianist and lead vocalist of The White Stripes until they split in February 2011, as well as a member of The Raconteurs and The Dead Weather.

He is ranked #70 on Rolling Stone's list of "The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time". White's popular and critical success with The White Stripes enabled him to collaborate as a solo artist with other renowned musicians, such as Beck, The Rolling Stones, Jeff Beck, Alicia Keys, Bob Dylan, Electric Six, Insane Clown Posse, and Loretta Lynn, whose 2004 album Van Lear Rose he produced and performed on. In 2006, White became a founding member of the rock band The Raconteurs. In 2009, he became a founding member and drummer of his third commercially successful group, The Dead Weather. He was awarded the title of "Nashville Music City Ambassador" by the Nashville mayor Karl Dean in 2011. White is set to release his debut solo album Blunderbuss on April 24, 2012.

White formed The White Stripes in 1997, along with Meg White, The band began its career as part of the Michigan garage rock underground music scene, playing with local bands such as Bantam Rooster, The Dirtbombs, The Paybacks, Rocket 455, and The Henchmen, among others. In 1998, The White Stripes were signed to Italy Records, a small and independent Detroit-based garage punk label, by Dave Buick. The band released its self-titled debut album in 1999, and a year later the album was followed up by the cult classic De Stijl. The album eventually peaked at #38 in Billboard Magazine's Independent Albums when the band had established their popularity. While performing and in music videos, Jack and Meg are very recognisable visually, as they dress only in red, white, and black.

In 2001 the band released White Blood Cells. The album's stripped-down garage rock sound drew critical acclaim in the UK and soon afterward in the US, making The White Stripes one of the more acclaimed bands of 2002. The album was followed up in 2003 by the commercially and critically successful Elephant. Allmusic wrote that the album "sounds even more pissed-off, paranoid and stunning than its predecessor ... darker and more difficult than White Blood Cells. " The album's first single,"Seven Nation Army," was the band's most successful.

The band's fifth album, Get Behind Me Satan, was recorded in White's own home and marked a change in the band's musical direction, with piano-driven melodies and experimentation with marimba and a more rhythm-based guitar playing by White. The band's sixth album Icky Thump, released in 2007, entered the UK Albums Chart at number one and debuted at number two on the Billboard 200. The album's sound also included more punk, garage and blues influences than its predecessor. In late 2007, the band announced the cancellation of 18 tour dates due to Meg White's acute anxiety problems.

White had revealed plans to release a seventh, as of yet untitled album in the summer of 2009. However, this has yet to happen. The band also made their first live appearance since Meg's anxiety problems in September 2007 on the final episode of Late Night with Conan O'Brien on February 20, 2009.

A documentary, The White Stripes: Under Great White Northern Lights, about the band's 2007 tour, in which they played a gig in every Canadian province and territory, appeared in the 2009 Toronto International Film Festival.

In July 2007, The White Stripes made history by playing the shortest concert ever only playing one note, in St John's, Newfoundland. They played a full show later that night at the Mile One Centre in downtown St. John's.

On February 2, 2011, it was reported on the main page of whitestripes.com that the duo has decided to part ways. White stated that it was not due to health issues or artistic differences but there were a "myriad of reasons."

White formed The Raconteurs in 2005 along with Brendan Benson, Jack Lawrence and Patrick Keeler. The origin of the band was the song 'Steady, As She Goes' which White wrote along with Benson. This inspired them to create a full band with the addition of Lawrence and Keeler. The band came together in Detroit during 2005 and, for the remainder of the year, recorded when time allowed. The band's debut album Broken Boy Soldiers was recorded at Benson's home in Detroit. The band set out on tour to support the album, including eight dates as the opening act for Bob Dylan. The group's second album, Consolers of the Lonely, and its first single, "Salute Your Solution", simultaneously in 2008. The album received a Grammy nomination.

In early 2009, Jack White formed a new group called The Dead Weather with The Kills frontwoman Alison Mosshart. White takes drum and vocal duties, while The Raconteurs bassist Jack Lawrence and Queens of the Stone Age keyboardist and guitarist Dean Fertita round the four piece out.

The group debuted a handful of new tracks on March 11, 2009 in Nashville from their debut album Horehound, which came out July 13, 2009 in Europe and July 14, 2009 in North America, on White's Third Man Records label.

On October 16, 2009, Mosshart confirmed that the second album was "halfway done." The first single "Die By The Drop" was released on March 30, 2010. The new album, Sea of Cowards was released on May 7 in Ireland, then on May 11, 2010, in the U.S. and May 10 in the United Kingdom, and again, on White's Third Man Records.

It was rumored that in 2003 White collaborated on Electric Six's song "Danger! High Voltage." Both he and the Electric Six denied this, and the vocal work was credited officially to John S O'Leary. However, a recent radio interview with Tim Shaw on Kerrang! 105.2 in the UK had Electric Six lead singer Dick Valentine talking openly about White singing on this song as well as speculating on the amount of money he was paid ($60,000). Also, a Q magazine article stated that Jack White did in fact work with Electric Six on the song "Gay Bar."

In 2008, White collaborated with Alicia Keys on the song "Another Way to Die," the theme song for the James Bond film Quantum of Solace.

He performed five songs for the Cold Mountain soundtrack; "Sittin' On Top Of The World," "Wayfaring Stranger," "Never Far Away," "Christmas Time Soon Will Be Over" and "Great High Mountain."

In 2009, Jack White was featured in It Might Get Loud, a film in which he, Jimmy Page, and The Edge come together to discuss the electric guitar and each artist's different playing methods. White's first solo single, "Fly Farm Blues," was written and recorded in 10 minutes during the filming of the movie, in August 2009. The single went on sale as a 7-inch vinyl record from Third Man Records and as a digital single available through iTunes on August 11.

In November 2010, producer Danger Mouse announced that White has been recruited for his collaboration with Daniele Luppi entitled Rome along with Norah Jones. White provided vocals to three songs on the album: "The Rose with the Broken Neck," "Two Against One" and "The World."

The song "You Know That I Know," finished and performed by White, was featured on "The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams," released on October 4th 2011.

On January 30, 2012 White released the single "Love Interruption". This is the first single from his first solo album, Blunderbuss, that is to be released on April 24, 2012. On March 3, 2012, he appeared on Saturday Night Live as the musical guest, with Lindsay Lohan hosting.

He'll be playing selected dates in the summer, with festivals such as Radio 1's Hackney Weekend, Sasquatch! Music Festival, Fuji Rock Festival in Japan and one of the biggest festivals in the world, Rock Werchter in Belgium.

Dispatch: Following a ten-year breakup, a Dispatch tour and reunion album are currently in the works! The smooth acoustic jam band made the '90s feel like a perpetual summer. Don't miss out on Dispatch tour dates and concert performances. Use Eventful as your source for Dispatch tour 2011 information and concert schedule updates.

Chad Urmston, Brad Corrigan, and Pete Heimbrold started the group while attending Middlebury College. They incorporated reggae, acoustic rock and folk and played in and around the local Vermont bar scene before relocating to Boston following graduation. Dispatch gained national recognition as independent artists who benefitted from Napster and constant touring to develop a national following. They built their fan-base largely around their live shows and evolved into a jam band known for their musical spontaneity. They released their debut album Silent Steeples in 1996 and toured constantly to promote the disc. Dispatch released their sophomore set, Bang Bang, featuring the radio-friendly single, "The General", which has become a staple of rock radio.

Dispatch released two more albums Four-Day Trials in 1999 and Who Are We Living For? in 2000 and toured extensively until 2002 when rising tensions forced an extended hiatus. Dispatch announced their break-up in 2002 and scheduled a final concert in 2004. The event known as "The Last Dispatch" was intended for an audience of about 30,000 at Boston's outdoor Hatch Shell venue; However, an estimated 100,000 fans from all over the world descended on the open air venue to see their last performance. The experience was chronicled in the documentary The Last Dispatch which details the final two weeks of the band's existence.

Following the break-up, all band members remained active in the music industry. Urmston fronted "State Radio", while Corrigan and Heimbrold went solo. Dispatch reunited in 2007 for a concert performance at Madison Square Garden to benefit Zimbabwe and the recent political upheaval that plagued the African nation. Due to high demand, tour dates for the benefit concert were extended and they added an additional two shows. In 2009, Dispatch was invited to the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C. to perform an acoustic show at the behest of Zimbabwean Prime Minister, Morgan Tsvangirai.

More recently, Dispatch announced in January, 2011 that a reunion concert tour was in the works. Dispatch tour dates have the band traveling throughout the country for the better part of Summer, 2011. In addition, Dispatch tour dates are slated alongside Dave Matthews Band on the DMB Caravan. A new EP was released in May, 2011 which featured the first set of original material in over a decade! Don't miss a tour date of this historic reunion. Use Eventful as your source for Dispatch tour dates and concert schedule information.

Skrillex: Before he even entered his twenties, Skrillex was bringing down some of LA's hottest clubs with his unique mix of dubstep and house. The Los Angeles based DJ has released three solo EP's since 2010 and is currently on the road promoting his latest, More Monsters and Sprites. Don't miss a performance on the Skrillex concert schedule (2011); Use Eventful as your source for Skrillex tour dates and venue information.

The native Angelino was first hired at sixteen by post-hardcore punk group, From First to Last, to be their guitarist. He stayed with the band from 2004 through 2007 and toured with the group on the Vans Warped Tour and the Dead by Dawn Tour. Skrillex released two albums with the group and went solo in 2007. Skrillex embarked on a solo tour and sold his demo work on the road. In 2008, Skrillex toured on the Ap Tour with All Time Low and The Matches. Skrillex released his debut EP, Gypsyhook EP and he toured with Hollywood Undead.

In 2010, Skrillex released his sophomore EP, Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites, and he announced a nationwide tour with Deadmau5. His production work and individual EPs are setting the music industry ablaze, and he was asked by Korn to produce a track for their latest album. Skrillex tour dates were booked at Coachella 2011 and he embarked on an Australia wide tour in May. His third EP, More Monsters and Sprites recently debuted at #5 on the Dance Albums chart and he announced a US-wide tour. Skrillex will be on the road throughout 2011; Use Eventful as your Skrillex concert calendar and for venue information.

Stevie Wonder: A prominent figure in popular music during the latter half of the 20th century, Wonder has recorded more than thirty U.S. top ten hits and won twenty-two Grammy Awards[2] (the most ever won by a solo artist) as well as a Lifetime Achievement Award. He has also won an Academy Award for Best Song,[3] and been inducted into both the Rock and Roll[4] and Songwriters[5] halls of fame. He has also been awarded the Polar Music Prize.[6] American music magazine Rolling Stone named him the ninth greatest singer of all time.[7][8] In June 2009 he became the fourth artist to receive the Montreal Jazz Festival Spirit Award.[9]

He has ten U.S. number-one hits on the pop charts as well as 20 R&B number one hits, and album sales totaling more than 100 million units. Wonder has recorded several critically acclaimed albums and hit singles, and writes and produces songs for many of his label mates and outside artists as well. Wonder plays the piano, synthesizer, harmonica, congas, drums, bass guitar, bongos, organ, melodica, and clavinet. In his childhood, he was best known for his harmonica work, but today he is better known for his keyboard skills and vocal ability. Wonder is the first Motown artist and second African American musician to win an Academy Award for Best Original Song for his 1984 hit single "I Just Called to Say I Love You" from the movie The Woman in Red. According to britishhitsongwriters.com he is the eleventh most successful songwriter in U.K. chart history based on weeks that his compositions have spent on the chart.

(From Wikipedia)